• What happens during a treatment?


  • What happens during a treatment?

    A typical massage treatment lasts between thirty and sixty minutes. The practitioner begins by taking a brief medical history in order to tailor the treatment to the client’s specific needs. Clients should always inform therapists of any fragile bones, bruises or recent surgery. The therapist will then leave the room, allowing time for the client to undress and lie down on a padded plinth equipped with a hole for the face to allow breathing. Treatment rooms are warm and normally quiet, although, soft music sometimes may be played. The limbs, head and back are then massaged, typically using oil. Those parts of the body that are not being massaged remain discreetly covered with towels.

    Various techniques may be used during massage, such as effleurage, petrissage, friction, kneading and tapotement.

    Effleurage involves gently stroking the length of the muscle.
    Petrissage is the application of pressure along the width of the muscle.
    Friction implies a circular motion with the thumbs or fingertips.
    Kneading entails squeezing the muscle across the width.
    Tapotement is light tapping or percussive movements.

    Practitioners who specialise in musculoskeletal problems or sports injuries may integrate manipulation techniques derived from physiotherapy, chiropractic and osteopathy.